Designing a Woodland Garden

April rhr 286

Last week we continued our efforts to increase the integration of the campus proper with the Crum Woods. In accordance with the Swarthmore College Master Plan, we have been planting woodland gardens to extend the edge of our natural area, the Crum Woods, and to expand our distinct sense of place.

Here are some pointers to create your own woodland garden:

Our latest woodland expansion into Parrish West Circle has two of our oldest Nyssa sylvatica as well as native Cladratis kentukea, Halesia diptera var. magniflora, and Quercus macrocarpo to mention a few that form the mature canopy. p

Our latest woodland expansion into Parrish West Circle has two of our oldest Nyssa sylvatica as well as native Cladratis kentukea, Halesia diptera var. magniflora, and Quercus macrocarpo to mention a few that form the mature canopy. photo credit:

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Deciduous Azaleas

May 13 2015 RHR 174Over the past several years we have been creating a woodland walk into our Scott Outdoor Amphitheater in order to integrate the campus proper with the Crum Woods. The stand-out plants in these gardens are deciduous azaleas.

Deciduous azaleas, like Rhododendron canescens x austrinum, make excellent ornamentals because they are easy to establish and have an extensive range of large, showy flower colors.

Deciduous azaleas, like Rhododendron canescens x austrinum, make excellent ornamentals because they are easy to establish and have an extensive range of large, showy flower colors. photo credit: R. Robert

Deciduous azaleas make excellent ornamentals because they are easy to establish and have an extensive range of large, showy flower colors. They offer blooms in spring with some cultivars even opening in the …

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Plant of the Week: May 23

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Aquilegia x clematiflora ‘Green Apples’

Aquilegia was one of my first favorite plants, mostly because of how its characteristics were immediately recognizable. Our native woodlands are home to the species Aquilegia canadensis, which features red, pendulous flowers with long nectar spurs. It doesn’t look like any other wildflower. A member of the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae, Aquilegia comes from the Latin “aquila” meaning eagle, most likely referring to the shape of the nectar spurs. This particular Aquilegia is not native to our woodlands and has been cultivated to exhibit a double flower with many more petals than the species. …

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