Plants of the Week – December 17

 

I find myself repeatedly admiring the form, character, and presence of the mature Quercus macrocarpa growing in the Terry Shane Teaching Garden. The bur oak is a slow growing oak native to the eastern United States bearing a columnar habit in its youth developing a broad crown with age. The bark is textural with deep ridges. The ridges become perfect anchoring points for mosses and lichens to take hold. Photo credit: J. Coceano

 

A variety of cultivars have resulted from selections of Magnolia virginiana. One such selection is M. virginiana var. australis ‘Santa Rosa’, known for being one of the most evergreen of the sweetbay magnolias. Protection provided by Clothier Hall creates a microclimate that further helps this specimen retain the glossy foliage. Photo credit: J. Coceano

 

Cool, linear, blue-green foliage of Dianthus ‘Frost Fire’ is a perfect complement for the double scarlet flowers. Dianthus works especially well along walkways or scattered throughout a rock garden. After flowering, plants benefit from shearing which helps freshen the foliage. Photo credit: J. Coceano

The fluffy seeds of Clematis ‘Bill Mackenzie’ are as attractive as the open, pendulous yellow flowers. Bright yellow 2” blossoms open in early summer and continue through early autumn. Flowers appear on new wood, thus prune in spring to shape the vine. Seedheads remain ornamental through the winter. Photo credit: J. Coceano

 

Categorized as Plant of the Week

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  1. Thanks for sharing the beauty. I want ALL of these plants!

    Nancy Y.

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