Plants of the Week – December 3

Magnolia grandiflora ‘Hasse’ is a cultivar of southern magnolia selected for its narrow columnar form. Trees typically reach up to 35’ in height with a spread of 10’. Magnolia grandiflora ‘Hasse’ is ideal for garden areas with limited horizontal space. A specimen can be seen growing in the Theresa Lang Fragrance Garden.  Photo credit: J. Coceano

 

Juncus effusus f. spiralis ‘Unicorn’ is a hybrid rush grown for its unique spiraling foliage. Rushes are grass-like plants that thrive in wet soils. Juncus effusus is a winter-hardy rhizomatous perennial. Containers around the Cunningham House and in the Cosby Courtyard feature this architecturally curious plant. Photo credit: J. Coceano

 

Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Kembu’ is in full flower providing a sweet and unexpected fragrance to passersby in the Theresa Lang Fragrance Garden. The cultivar is not as common as ‘Gulftide’ or ‘Goshiki’ but is appealing for its more compact habit, often reaching only 4-5’ in height, and for its narrow, puckered leaves which are streaked with random blotches of white variegation. Photo credit: J. Coceano

 

Japanese forest grass, Hakonechloa macra, comes into its own during the late fall and early winter. The species bears bright pale green leaves which transition to a warm golden-brown color. The arching habit of the grass is capable of bouncing back from rains, but often flattens under wet snow loads. Cut back once flattened. Photo credit: J. Coceano

Categorized as Plant of the Week

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