ARTiculture all summer long

This Sunday, March 9 the Philadelphia Flower Show’s celebration of art and horticulture (ARTiculture) comes to a close, but you can enjoy ARTiculture all summer long. Stroll the grounds of Scott Arboretum to explore the sculpture collection, including pieces by Alexander Calder and Steve Tobin, both featured at the Flower Show.

Many of the exhibitors created stunning garden interpretations of canvas art, like James Basson of Scape Design interpretation of “Untitled” by Albert Diato. photo credit: R. Robert

Horticulture is an art form unto itself, as celebrated at the show, and each discipline inspires the other. Andy Warhol’s “Flowers,” featured near the PHS shop, is truly inspired by horticulture featuring the iconic hibiscus flower. Many of the exhibitors created stunning garden interpretations of canvas art, like James Basson of Scape Design interpretation of “Untitled” by Albert Diato.

Calder's Back from Rio is located between Kohlberg Hall and Science Center. photo credit: J. McLucas

The Flower Show entrance garden was inspired by Philadelphia’s historic family of artists, the Calders. At the Flower Show, there are Calder-inspired garden mobiles; at the Scott Arboretum we feature Calder’s mobile Back from Rio in our gardens. Come see how wind gently moves and rotates this piece in the garden.

Steve Tobin's artwork was featured at the Philadelphia Flower Show. photo credit: R. Robert

Gardens serve as wonderful backdrops for sculpture, large and small. In 2010, Steve Tobin’s piece Red Steelroot was donated to the Arboretum. Many of Tobin’s root-inspired pieces were on display at the Flower Show this year, allowing visitors to walk under, though, and around “roots” as never before. Situated in the Gold Medal Garden, Red Steelroot allows for the opportunity to “walk” among the roots in all seasons.

Situated in the Gold Medal Garden, Red Steelroot allows for the opportunity to “walk” among the roots in all seasons. photo credit: C. Sawyers

Another piece of art inspired by nature is the current temporary installation of Stacy Levy’s Crum Creek Meander along Magill Walk. Fascinated by water and its relationship to our world, Stacy Levy strives to reveal the beauty of unseen patterns in nature and the presence of natural forces in our built environments. Crum Creek Meander is a representation of the Crum Creek placed in the middle of campus for all to experience and explore, bringing this backbone of the environment to our attention and awareness.

Sappho by Alekos Kyriakos sits among the spring daffodils near Sharples Dining Hall. photo credit: R. Robert

Art and horticulture inspire one another to create amazing landscapes, canvases, and sculpture. Experience your ARTiculture at the Scott Arboretum with spring dogwood flowers and daffodils as well as summer roses and coneflowers.

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