Garden Practices

What’s Old Will be New Again

IMG_2732Now that old man winter has descended upon us, as gardeners, we are looking for projects to get us out of the house. It is the perfect time to renovate that old boxwood (Buxus) hedge. Fellow gardener, Nicole Selby, and I performed this rejuvenation on an aging boxwood hedge last month.

Here you can see half of the old boxwood hedge has been pruned. photo credit: A. Glas

Here you can see half of the old boxwood hedge has been pruned. photo credit: A. Glas

This particular hedge is informal in style. Due its informal style, regular yearly pruning to maintain its shape is not necessary. However, over time informal hedges can begin to look tired …

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Clematis Pruning: The Early Years

July 10 2014 rhr 035Have you ever come across a clematis with long, stringy stems reaching into a towering tree with the glorious blooms gracing only the upper reaches of the tree? These clematis vines can only be admired from afar as the blooms are well above human height. This phenomenon can be avoided with some simple pruning in the early years of your vine.

October29 2014 RHR 132

Clematis I Am(R) Happy  in full bloom. photo credit: R. Robert

It doesn’t matter whether your specimen is in group 1, 2,3 or A, B, C; the pruning steps are all the same the first three years. This pruning …

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What is that smell?

September 23 2015 RHR 006

Have you ever notice a “fishy” smell coming from the Dean Bond Rose Garden? This is part of our organic rose garden procedure. Applied roughly every two weeks depending on conditions, a mixture of fish hydrolysate and water (1.5 ounces per gallon) is sprayed liberally on the plants of the Dean Bond Rose Garden.

Black spot on leaves in the Dean Bond Rose Garden. photo credit: R. Robert

Black spot on leaves in the Dean Bond Rose Garden. photo credit: R. Robert

In addition to working as a fertilizer, fish hydrolysate applications function as a fungicide. Similar to a chemical fungicide, fish emulsion is applied while wearing protective gear; the entire plant is coated. …

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