Garden Practices

Tree Preservation Efforts: Hydrovac Excavation

August 3 2017 RHR 206

As major construction occurs across campus, there are several efforts ongoing to preserve our mature trees, including tree protection zones and hydrovac excavation.

Sometimes, sidewalks and utilities under our large trees needs to be modified, requiring disturbance of the roots. Digging a large exploratory hole with steel tools damages the critical root zone by wounding trunks and roots as well as increasing soil compaction.

Here you can see hydrovac excavation uses pressurized water to break up the soil cover.  photo credit: R. Robert

Here you can see hydrovac excavation uses pressurized water to break up the soil cover. photo credit: R. Robert

Pressurized water or air can effectively remove soil without damaging the tree’s delicate root system. Soil has …

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Tree Protection Zone

September 23 2015 RHR 031

“Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago.” –Warren Buffet

photo credit: R. Robert

Chain link fences surrounding trees can be seen encircling the BEP construction site. photo credit: R. Robert

As we undergo large construction projects across campus, visitors will observe chain link fences surrounding trees around the construction sites. These are creating tree protection zones to preserve our mature trees.

Trees provide natural beauty and give human scale to built landscapes. They filter air, purify water, lower heating/cooling bills, increase property values, improve social interactions, and provide habitat as well as a food for …

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What’s Old Will be New Again

IMG_2732Now that old man winter has descended upon us, as gardeners, we are looking for projects to get us out of the house. It is the perfect time to renovate that old boxwood (Buxus) hedge. Fellow gardener, Nicole Selby, and I performed this rejuvenation on an aging boxwood hedge last month.

Here you can see half of the old boxwood hedge has been pruned. photo credit: A. Glas

Here you can see half of the old boxwood hedge has been pruned. photo credit: A. Glas

This particular hedge is informal in style. Due its informal style, regular yearly pruning to maintain its shape is not necessary. However, over time informal hedges can begin to look tired …

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